Hackolog
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Transferring information to computers via PSK31 may be quite boring due to the lack of a iambic paddle. This project was tested with a computer on the back of NYCR that receives commands via a paddle. Read on to know more.

Data transfer can be done via radio, and anyone with an amateur radio license around the globe can do it. But it is not the paddle itself that creates the code, it is the radio’s responsibility, or in this specific case, the Teensy 2.0. It runs a machine that listens to PINB4 to indicate a “dah” and PINB5 for a “dit”.

It is the “dit” and “dah” that compound the code. Each “dah” impulse is longer than “dit”. Every command on the database is properly identified using morse code. The iambic paddle offers a great advantage over a straight key system because with this the computer does not spend time decoding signals.

This simple function allows the use of a small microcontroller like the ATMega32U4. Trying to generate CW without any feedback is really hard. This is the reason why the system includes a speaker that directly transmits an audible pulse according to the signals produced.

Finally, when the computer receives a morse coded command that matches any of the preset options it has, it is executed.